Secondary Sources

The citations on this page are scholarly, intellectual, and other nonfiction texts. Many of them deal directly with food politics, history, or theory; others may provide a theoretical lens through which food issues may be examined productively. They are loosely grouped by discipline, a designation which is not meant to be binding or prescriptive. Some citations will appear in more than one area of study.

Where possible, documents are cited according to MLA citation; however, I do not have complete information or recollection of some sources. The annotations are not meant to summarize, but to indicate why I included the text in my reading and writing.

Art and Aesthetic Theory

Benjamin, Walter. “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction.” Web.
A classic; this long essay defines the unique appeal of art and considers how that may alter when it is mass reproduced. Of possible interest to the discussions of whether food is art and art that is made out of food.
On this blog: Wine in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction

Doty, Mark.  Still Life with Oysters and Lemon.  Boston: Beacon Press, 2001. Print.
Inspired by the author’s visceral response to the titular still life, this slim book explores our appetite for beautiful objects and images.
On this blog: Federico Garcia Lorca’s Alimentary Allusions

Kolnai. Aurel. On Disgust. Chicago: Open Court, 2004. Print.
One of the first thorough phenomenologies of disgust which doesn’t rely on psychoanalysis.
On this blog: I Scream

Korsmeyer, Carolyn.  Making Sense of Taste: Food and Philosophy.  Ithaca:  Cornell University Press. 1999. Print.
Part history, part treatise, this book explains how taste and smell came to occupy such a low place in philosophical inquiry, and lays the groundwork for further investigation of the bodily senses in aesthetic theory.
On this blog: Ars Gastronomica

Korsmeyer, Carolyn. Savoring Disgust: The Foul and Fair in Aesthetics. New York: Oxford University Press. 2011. Print.
This book draws on some of Korsmeyer’s previous work on disgust as an aesthetic experience, but she follows this inquiry to certain particularities of disgust, such as being attracted to something that also disgusts, or feeling disgusted yet also contemplative toward an artwork.

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Anthropology/Sociology

Bourdieu, Pierre. Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgment of Taste. Web.
Within his theory that social class determines preference to some degree, Bourdieu maps food preferences along the axes of economic and cultural capital.
On Table Matters: In Good Taste. On this blog: Confessions of a kalevangelist; Search Term Sampler: Why do certain foods seem to be gendered?

Clark, Dylan.  “The Raw and the Rotten: Punk Cuisine.”  Ethnology, Vol. 43 No. 1  (Winter 2004), 19-31.
A clever take on Lévi-Strauss’s culinary triangle, exploring a counterculture foodways in Seattle.

Friedan, Betty. The Feminine Mystique (50th Anniversary Edition). New York: W. W. Norton, 2013. Ebook.
Friedan actually comes from a background in psychology, but she does a great deal of interviewing and comparing the stories of women who were dissatisfied with their lives as housewives.
On this blog: Dismantling a couple of strawfeminists

Johnston, Josee and Baumann, Shyon. Foodies: Democracy and Distinction in the Gourmet Foodscape. London: Routledge, 2009. Print.
An examination of the discourse and ideology of “foodie”-ism, which is distinguished by twin urges to distinguish oneself by consuming the best of food while casting food as something anyone can enjoy.
On this blog: One Way of Looking at Foodies

Lévi-Strauss, Claude. The Origin of Table Matters (Mythologiques Volume 3). Translated by John and Doreen Weightman. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1990. Print.
On Table Matters: Raw, Cooked, Rotten

Mintz, Sidney W. Sweetness and Power: The Place of Sugar in Modern History. New York: Penguin Books, 1985. Print.
Mintz is an anthropologist, but this critical work in food studies takes a historical approach to how sugar went from an expensive luxury to a commonplace staple–and how that altered the lives of the people who produced and consumed it.
On this blog:  Search Term Sampler: Why do certain foods seem to be gendered?

Young, Sera L.  Craving Earth: Understanding Pica, the Urge to Eat Clay, Starch, Ice, and Chalk.  New York: Columbia University Press, 2011. Ebook.
Anthropologist and nutritrionist Young offers an expansive, sympathetic look of pica, debunking many myths about its practice and demographics.
On this blog: Review: Craving Earth

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Contemporary Cultural Studies

Jurafsky, Dan. The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, Inc., 2014. Print.
Half linguistic history and half quantitative research, this accessible book sheds light on patterns in modern food discourse.
On this blog: The Secret Language of Yelp ReviewsSearch Term Sampler: Why do certain foods seem to be gendered?

Matchar, Emily. Homeward Bound: Why Women are Embracing the New Domesticity. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2013. Ebook.
An engaging look at the reasons and ways women (and some men) are reviving domestic crafts for fun and profit.

Monson, Ander. Vanishing Point: Not a Memoir. Minneapolis: Graywolf Press, 2010. Print.
This collection of essay includes several reflections on modern eating habits, including a significant exploration of the way artificial flavors are made and how the author feels about them. (He’s a connosieur.)

Pollan, Michael. Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation. New York: The Penguin Press, 2013. Ebook.
Since he somehow made it through multiple bestsellers on food without learning how to cook, Pollan documents his own transformation by way of barbecuing, stovetop cooking, baking, and fermenting.
On Table Matters: Undercooked. On this blog: The Basics; Dismantling a couple of strawfeminists.

Sax, David. The Tastemakers: Why We’re Crazy for Cupcakes But Fed Up with Fondue. New York: Public Affairs, 2014. Advanced reading copy.
A readable romp through dozens of food fads from recent years–from cupcakes to celebrity chefs to ancient ingredients–with some speculation as to how a fad blows up into a national and, sometimes, enduring trend.
On this blog: The Flight of the Kiwi

Yamashita, Karen Tei. Circle K Cycles. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2001. Print.
Yamashita explores the lives and culture of Brazilian-Japanese communities in Japan.
On this blog: White-washing rice and other telling tales

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Feminist Studies

Adams, Carole. The Sexual Politics of Meat. New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2010. Print.
A cornerstone study in feminist food politics. Adams draws parallels between the sexist oppression of women and the oppression of animals. The book is at its most convincing when exploring the gendered language and cultural connotations of meat.
On this blog: The Semiotics of SpamSearch Term Sampler: Why do certain foods seem to be gendered?

Bordo, Susan.  Unbearable Weight: Feminism, Western Culture, and the Body.  Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003.
A critical work in the field of body studies and fat studies. Bordo explores the history and cultural representation of slenderness, the gendering of hunger, and more.

Friedan, Betty. The Feminine Mystique (50th Anniversary Edition). New York: W. W. Norton, 2013. Ebook.
Friedan comes from a background in psychology and marketing, and she does a great deal of interviewing and comparing the stories of women who were dissatisfied with their lives as housewives.
On this blog: Dismantling a couple of strawfeminists

hooks, bell. “Eating the Other.” Black Looks:  race and representation.  Boston: South End Press, 1992. 21-39. Viewed digitally.
hooks uses the conceit of ethnicity as spice to describe the ways white people consume nonwhite culture in a way that reinforces racism: “Within commodity culture, ethnicity becomes spice, seasoning that can liven up the dull dish that is mainstream white culture.”
On this blog: “Eating the Other”: bell hooks on ethnicity as spice

Salvio, Paula M. Salvio.  “Dishing It Out: Food Blogs and Post-Feminist Domesticity.” Gastronomica. Vol. 12. No.3 (Fall 2012): 31-39. Print.
Explores constructions of femininity on popular food blogs.
On this blog: Response to “Dishing it Out” Part 1 and Part 2

Woolf, Virginia. A Room of One’s Own. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1957.
After wryly noting that novelists rarely discuss what their characters eat, Woolf launches into a lavish description of a sumptuous meal served at a men’s college, then contrasts with the more meager offerings afforded to the women’s college in the same university.

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History

Charsley, Simon. Wedding Cakes and Cultural History. London: Routledge, 1992. Print.
Charsley is an anthropologist by training, but his research led him into an in-depth exploration of the wedding cake traditions from beginnings to contemporary Scotland.
On Table Matters: Taking the Cake. On this blog: Highlights from wedding cake history.

Mintz, Sidney W. Sweetness and Power: The Place of Sugar in Modern History. New York: Penguin Books, 1985. Print.
Mintz is an anthropologist, but this critical work in food studies takes a historical approach to how sugar went from an expensive luxury to a commonplace staple–and how that altered the lives of the people who produced and consumed it.
On this blog:  Search Term Sampler: Why do certain foods seem to be gendered?

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Literary Criticism

Delville, Michael.  Food, Poetry, and the Aesthetics of Consumption: Eating the Avant-Garde. New York, London: Routledge, 2008.  Print.
Explores the use of food imagery in modern poetry.

Ellman, Maud.  The Hunger Artists.  Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1993.
A weird, slim volume which the intersection of eating, starving, and writing; examples include the Irish Nationalist hunger strike, Kafka’s “A Hunger Artist,” and Clarissa.

Gilbert, Sandra. The Culinary Imagination: From Myth to Modernity. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2014. Ebook.
A sweeping survey of food scenes in literature and art, mostly American, mostly 20th Century.

Hale, Elizabeth. “James Bond and the Art of Eating Eggs.” Gastronomica. Vol. 12, no. 4 (Winter 2012): 84-90. Print.
The author examines instances of James Bond eating and cooking eggs in Ian Fleming’s novels.
On this blog: What Would James Bond Eat?

Koivuvaara,Pirjo. Hunger, Consumption, and Identity in Elizabeth Gaskell’s Novels. Tampere University Press, 2012. Dissertation, PDF. [link]

Lipkowitz, Ina. Words to Eat By: Five Foods and the Culinary History of the English Language. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2011. Print.
On Table Matters: The History of Eggplant in Four Languages.

Morton, Timothy.  The poetics of spice: romantic consumerism and the exotic.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000. Print.
Explores the impact of spice trade on the poetics of the Romantic period. Includes some excellent analysis of ekphrasis.

Radway, Janice A. “Reading is not Eating: Mass-Produced Literature, and the Theoretical, Methodological, and Political Consequences of a Metaphor.” Book Research Quarterly (Fall 1986).
Radway challenges the way mass market paperback readers are frequently depicted as mindless consumers swallowing pap; she credits them with a great deal more agency and selection.
On this blog: The metaphors of mass consumerism

Salvio, Paula M. Salvio.  “Dishing It Out: Food Blogs and Post-Feminist Domesticity.” Gastronomica. Vol. 12. No.3 (Fall 2012): 31-39. Print.
Explores constructions of femininity on popular food blogs.
On this blog: Response to “Dishing it Out” Part 1 and Part 2

Schneider, Stephen. “Good, Clean, Fair: The Rhetoric of the Slow Food Movement.” College English. Vol. 70, No. 4, Special Focus: Food (March 2008), 384-402.
A smart, straightforward analysis of the language of the contemporary Slow Food Movement.

Thomas, Kate. “Alimentary: Arthur Conan Doyle and Isabella Beeton.” Victorian Literature and Culture, Vol. 36, No. 2 (2008), pp. 375-390. PDF, JSTOR.
Traces the literal and metaphoric connections between Doyle’s mass-consumed Sherlock Holmes stories and Beeton’s domestic management manuals.

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Philosophy

Barthes, Roland. Mythologies. Trans. Annette Lavers. New York: Hill and Wang, 1972. Print.
In a series of short essays exploring the semiotics of various cultural markers from his native France, Barthes considers the cultural meanings of milk, steak, wine, and ornamental cookery among other things.
On this blog: Music Playlist #10: Got Milk?

Descartes, Rene.  Discourse on Method and Meditations on First Philosophy.  Trans. Donald A. Cress.  Indianapolis:  Hackett Publishing Company, 1998. Print.
Descartes plays with a ball of wax, laying the groundwork for aesthetic philosophy even though  he doubts the senses and divides them from the mind.

Kant, Immanuel.  Critique of Judgment.  Trans. Werner S. Pluhar.  Indianapolis:  Hackett Publishing Company, 1987. Print.
Among other things, Kant describes the phenomenology of aesthetic judgments, from liking and disliking to the contemplation of beauty.
On this blog: Ars Gastronomica

Kolnai. Aurel. On Disgust. Chicago: Open Court, 2004. Print.
One of the first thorough phenomenologies of disgust which doesn’t rely on psychoanalysis.
On this blog: I Scream

Korsmeyer, Carolyn.  Making Sense of Taste: Food and Philosophy.  Ithaca:  Cornell University Press. 1999. Print.
Part history, part treatise, this book explains how taste and smell came to occupy such a low place in philosophical inquiry, and lays the groundwork for further investigation of the bodily senses in aesthetic theory.
On this blog: Ars Gastronomica

Korsmeyer, Carolyn. Savoring Disgust: The Foul and Fair in Aesthetics. New York: Oxford University Press. 2011. Ebook.
This monograph explores the phenomenology of disgust in more depth.

Kristeva, Julia. Powers of Horror: an essay on abjection. Trans. Leon S. Roudiez. New York: Columbia University Press, 1982.
The concept of abjection makes a useful counterpoint to the concept of disgust. Interestingly, one of Kristeva’s key examples of abjection is food-related (milk with a skin on top).

Sartre, Jean-Paul. Being and Nothingness. Web.
On this blog: Bread, Milk, and Eggs

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