Link Buffet: The Most Interesting Links in the World

I don’t always update my food blog, but when I do, it is because Food Twitter has been turning out a smorgasbord of good food writing and art.

A Gardener Spreads Joy Through the Cultivation of Lemon Trees in a New Animated Short

From Laymun, dir. Catherine Prowse and Hannah Quinn. Via Colossal.

Glamour: I’m a Great Cook. Now That I’m Divorced, I’m Never Making Dinner for a Man Again

The Cut interviewed a confessed office fridge thief who specialized in snacking from the common space while he was working late, and his answers pretty much track to the fraud triangle I explored here and elsewhere: opportunity (working alone at night), rationalization (he’s totally gonna replace it tomorrow), motivation (it’s unfair that he has to work so late).

I’ve been following Amanda Mull on Twitter for awhile and enjoying her takes on fashion, especially plus size fashion. Now that she’s writing for The Atlantic, I am enjoying her smart and nuanced articles on health and wellness topics, like the troubling language of technology and optimization in recent weight loss products.

Miniature Watercolor Landscapes and Fashion Sketches Delicately Painted on Used Tea Bags

By Ruby Silvious. Via Colossal.

Grammar Girl: 7 Surprising Places We Got Phrases About Food

I tended to avoid food memoirs and first-person food writing while analyzing food scenes in poetry and fiction, so I’ve only brushed the occasional M.F.K. Fisher essay in my reading. Still, I think about “I Was Really Very Hungry” frequently–envying both the meal in a small roadside French inn, exquisitely prepared and exquisitely described, and  Fisher’s unapologetic appetite for food and freedom roaming the French countryside. So I appreciated the insight into her life and writing in “M.F.K. Fisher and the Art of the Culinary Selfie,” an essay I can’t imagine being written by anyone other than the formidable Ruby Tandoh, who writes better than most on the complexities of gender and class and identity in the food world.

Speaking of formidable and unapologetic women in the food world: I’ve only dipped into Netflix’s Salt Fat Acid Heat, but that is because I am savoring it. Just in the first episode there are miles of butter and generous pours of oil and lots of Samin Nosrat’s eyebrows arching in surprise and pleasure–it’s a visual comfort I’d prefer to take in sips. But in the meantime, I appreciated the New Yorker’s short rhapsody to the sensuous joys of the series.

As a The Good Place fan, I can’t help but wonder if this artist’s work inspired the egg-smashing scene in “A Fractured Inheritance”: Sarah Lucas got Women to Throw 1000 Eggs at the Wall

Sarah Lucas. 1000 Eggs: For Women, 2018 at the New Museum, New York. Via Elephant.

Some time ago I saved this Paste link about avocado beer becoming a thing, but I don’t even remember why I cared, because in Philadelphia everything is coming up Gritty. Nightmare Fuel by Broken Goblet Brewing, made with “bloodied oranges,” is fairly representative of the city’s early Gritty takes when we were all still shaken by his googly eyes and chaotic energy. Gritty Gruel by ARS Brewery, made with local faves Rival Brothers coffee and Federal Donuts, came out later when we’d more or less decided to love our orange monster–and it actually sounds kind of delicious.

There is something smart to be said here about surfaces, visual appeal, and cooking shows–but despite my fascination with Barthes’ “Ornamental Cookery,” I am not well-versed enough in the beloved cult phenomenon of GBBO (which inspired this artwork) to comment: These French Desserts Are Made of Glass and Clay

Shayna Leib. Noisette au caramel. Via Atlas Obscura.

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