The Future of Food

Or rather, the present: all of these innovations of technology and urban design are happening now, although they are still under development and, in many cases, need creative minds and collaborators to reach their full potential.

Food Forests

Take Part covers the establishment of a food forest in Seattle’s Beacon Hill.  Food foresting is not a new idea at all, but Seattle will have the first public food forest in the nation. It is meant to be perennial and self-sustaining, and (at least at first) there will be no regulation of who comes in and picks what. Free blueberries for all.

Relatedly. . .

Edible Bus Stops

In Stockwell, London, bus stops in otherwise bleak urban areas are transformed into small green spaces with gardens of edible plants.

Wine Lakes, Butter Mountains, and other Food Stockpiles

When we talk about food ownership, we have to talk about populations who don’t have enough of it (and, by implication, those of us that have more than enough).

Nicola Twilley at Edible Geography wrote an informative post about food reserves and stockpiles, and has boosted a call for designers repeatedly on Twitter. Food stockpiles, too, are nothing new–those of us raised in the middle states are familiar with the sight of grain silos, and Twilley posts some intriguing, Willa Wonka-esque photos of butter and wine reserves in which surplus specialty goods are stored to keep the market stable. But the development of food reserves is one that calls for cutting-edge technology, design, and planning: to protect perishable goods from climate and pests; to manage rotation and release of stockpiled goods; to account for local dietary needs and preferences; etc.

3D printing food

This futuristic food development is happening right here in Philly: at Hive76, a bioengineer is using a desktop 3D printer to sketch out delicate vascular systems in sugar–as well as some other more playful projects. You can read my take on the food printing experiments at Table Matters.

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