Elsewhere on the Internet: Wheats and sweets

  • From the Fat Nutritionist, Wheat and Death: bringing a little balance to current discussions about wheat and gluten. While some folks are genuinely and seriously gluten-intolerant, there isn’t much  research yet that suggests the general population will benefit from the current fashionable wheat panic (which reminds me of egg panic, as I dimly remember it from the 80s). As the Nutritionist points out, there is relevant cultural and historical context for eating wheat in its various forms; more research is needed before we go voluntarily gluten-free.
  • Only tangentially related: when I saw the title of the above post, I immediately thought of “Cake or death?” so here is a lego version of Eddie Izzard’s classic standup set.)
  • In the National Post, a sweet article about the Pittsburgh tradition of the cookie table at weddings. (h/t Emily Matchar.) It’s been about eight years since I attended a Pittsburgh wedding–and many happy returns, Jess and Larry!–but I definitely remember being introduced to the cookie table tradition for the first time.
  • Speaking of cookies and Pittsburgh: in my puzzle editor days, I came across the food history tidbit that pizzelles are considered one of the oldest forms of cookie. (Link goes to the ever-excellent Food Timeline). These days pizzelles are usually shaped and baked in irons, like waffle irons, but ceramic casts for such flat cookies have been excavated from ancient Italian ruins. I’m no great fan of pizzelles–they frequently come so heavily perfumed with anise that they make everything around them taste like licorice–but I associate them with Pittsburgh and spending holidays with my family there, since cookie-exchange is as much a part of Pittsburgh Christmas as it is part of Pittsburgh weddings. It delights me that ancient Abbruzzians invented these speciality cookies so long ago, possibly even before inventing a means of leavening bread.
Image from Brown Eyed Baker (with recipe).

Image from Brown Eyed Baker (with recipe).

About these ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s